4 Types of Employment Screening

Hiring new employees can be a time consuming and expensive process that no employer wants to have to go through twice because they hired the wrong employee. Additionally, failing to properly screen employees can expose employers to liability claims. For these reasons, many employers choose to run these four types of employment screens before hiring new employees.

  1. Drug Testing

Employees who use illicit drugs on the job can be a risk to themselves and others. Additionally, they may not be productive and may be prone to making mistakes or even expose their employer to liability claims. For this reason, many employers choose to run a 10 panel drug test to screen employees for use of illegal substances. If an employer chooses to do drug screening, they must screen all employees per state law.

  1. Criminal History

State laws govern how employers may use criminal history in their hiring processes. Where it is legal to do so, some employers may refuse to hire candidates with certain types of criminal backgrounds, such as felony convictions. Criminal history may disqualify candidates from holding positions of trust, such as working with children, in some states. In other cases, employers may be willing to overlook some or all past convictions but may disqualify applicants who did not disclose their criminal history on their application.

  1. Credit Check

Many employers check employees’ credit to determine whether they have financial problems that may impact the quality of their work or their trustworthiness to handle company assets. This is particularly true of employees who will have access to a company’s finances. Some employers also use credit reports to evaluate character traits, such as personal responsibility. Employers must obtain consent from the employee and follow the rules outlined in the Fair Credit Reporting Act.

  1. Driving Records

If an employee will be driving a company vehicle during their employment, the employer may check their driving record before hiring them. An employee who causes an accident while operating a company vehicle can expose an employer to liability claims, leading to large settlements or higher insurance premiums. An employee who has a history of causing accidents, DUIs or other issues may not be a good risk.

There is no foolproof method of hiring the perfect employee. However, employers can protect themselves against hiring employees who may pose a high risk due to drug use, poor driving record, criminal history or poor financial decisions by conducting these four employment screens.

Paul watson

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